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Bill Woodrow
In Woodrow's Pond Life drypoint etchings the technique renders ancient species – pike, eels, amphibians – in beautifully naturalistic fashion but, at the same time, reflects the savagery of the underwater world, its predators and victims. Net is an almost sculptural, three-dimensional etching. ‘I was thinking of doing something with tadpoles; I have a strong childhood memory of raising tadpoles. I realized I could form the image of the net used to catch tadpoles into a skull shape using the lines like contours. It really was a nice thing to draw.’
Technique
Etching: drypoint, hardground printed on 350gsm Hahnemühle Roll Bright paper. From a portfolio of 16 etchings published by The Paragon Press in 2004.

Bill Woodrow

Bill Woodrow (born 1 November 1948) is a British sculptor. He studied at Winchester School of Art from 1967–68, St Martin’s School of Art, London from 1968–71 and Chelsea School of Art, London from 1971–72. His early work was made with found materials. Woodrow collected all manner of things, from materials found in dumps to large consumer goods. In altering them he gave them a new context, allowing for an element of narrative in his work. In the 1990s, he began to make work in bronze, as in a seminal work – In Awe of the Pawnbroker, 1994 – in which the meaning of the pawnbroker's symbol is unraveled. Woodrow was one of three artists selected to make a sculpture for the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square for the year 2000. His submitted sculpture explored the destruction of planet Earth by humans and the lasting and eventually victorious strengths of nature over the human legacy.


Availability: In stock

£1,080.00

Pond Life (Net)

Pond Life (Net)

Pond Life (Net)

Etching
A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Etching
Edition of 15
Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse

£1,080.00

Sheet size
35.2 x 111.4 cm
133¾ x 43¾ in

Image size
n/a

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Pond Life (Net)
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Details

In Woodrow's Pond Life drypoint etchings the technique renders ancient species – pike, eels, amphibians – in beautifully naturalistic fashion but, at the same time, reflects the savagery of the underwater world, its predators and victims. Net is an almost sculptural, three-dimensional etching. ‘I was thinking of doing something with tadpoles; I have a strong childhood memory of raising tadpoles. I realized I could form the image of the net used to catch tadpoles into a skull shape using the lines like contours. It really was a nice thing to draw.’

Additional Information

First Name Bill
Last Name Woodrow
Artist Description

Bill Woodrow (born 1 November 1948) is a British sculptor. He studied at Winchester School of Art from 1967–68, St Martin’s School of Art, London from 1968–71 and Chelsea School of Art, London from 1971–72. His early work was made with found materials. Woodrow collected all manner of things, from materials found in dumps to large consumer goods. In altering them he gave them a new context, allowing for an element of narrative in his work. In the 1990s, he began to make work in bronze, as in a seminal work – In Awe of the Pawnbroker, 1994 – in which the meaning of the pawnbroker's symbol is unraveled. Woodrow was one of three artists selected to make a sculpture for the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square for the year 2000. His submitted sculpture explored the destruction of planet Earth by humans and the lasting and eventually victorious strengths of nature over the human legacy.

Edition of 15
Ed Date 2004
Inscriptions Signed by the artist & numbered on the reverse
Short Technique Etching
Sheet Size 35.2 x 111.4 cm
Sheet Size (Inches) 133¾ x 43¾ in
Image Size n/a
Image Size (inches) No
Technical Description Etching: drypoint, hardground printed on 350gsm Hahnemühle Roll Bright paper. From a portfolio of 16 etchings published by The Paragon Press in 2004.
Technique Pop ups A metal plate, normally copper or zinc or steel, is covered with an acid-resistant layer of rosin mixed with wax (this is called the ‘ground’). With a sharp point, the artist draws through this ground, but not into the metal plate. The plate is placed in an acid bath and the acid bites into the metal plate where the drawn lines have exposed it. The waxy ground is cleaned off and the plate is covered in ink, then wiped clean, so that ink is retained only in the etched lines. The plate can then be printed through an etching press. The strength of the etched line depends on the length of time the plate is left in the acid bath.
Price on Application No
Display Custom Popup N/A
Custom pop up link Title N/A
Custom Popup Title N/A
Custom Pop up Description N/A

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